Screens of Glass Truths

Poetry 101 wanted us to write about screens and utilize enjambments. I’m not good at just enjambing on the fly. So I wrote it in the form of a sonnet, and then I went back and changed the flow around. Here they are: first with enjambment and then as a sonnet, what do you think? 

We’re hidden

Here behind these screens of glass.

Few little words

Just sitting there.

They glow.

But truth is now revealed

By all

En mass.

These screens allow ideas

Free flow.

These screens they hide us

Thus allowing sights

Of our true reality

To be quite clearly seen

Through masks

In starkest lights.

But choices we make

Limit what we see.

The truth sits bare and ready

But we choose

To hide it in the screens

And not so much as look.

But look we should

For truth may break or bruise.

It’s not just a word

There in a book.

The screens

They have the truth.

It’s bared for all.

Do you now choose to look?

Or raise a wall?

Now as a sonnet: 

We’re hidden here, behind these screens of glass.

Few little words just sitting there. They glow.

But truth is now revealed by all – en mass.

These screens allow ideas free flow.

These screens, they hide us. Thus allowing sights

Of our true reality to be

Quite clearly seen through masks in starkest lights.

But choices we make limit what we see.

The truth sits bare and ready, but we choose

To hide it in the screens and not so much as look.

But look we should for truth may break or bruise.

It’s not just a word there in a book.

The screens, they have the truth bared for all.

Do you now choose to look? Or raise a wall?

Vanishing NeighborThis was written as part of a response to Vanishing Neighbor by Marc Dukelman. If you’d like to read more of my responses try these. The essay that reflects and expands on the poem is called “All We See, is All We Want to See.” The book also discusses education, which prompted me to write “Why Highschool?” Dunkelman also wonders what ethics will look like in the year 2050, but does not attempt to answer the question. So I took a stab at it in “Ethics in 2050.”

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